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Sinkers for Worm Fishing
Picking the right lead for worm fishing
 Join the Discussion
"What style and type of sinker do you use for plastic worm fishing? Why?"
Ronnie
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Sinkers for fishing plastic worms come in a huge variety of sizes, shapes and colors.  Some of the differences don't really seem to make much difference, some can help you fish specific places and types of cover.  

Some factors to consider when choosing leads:

• Weight

• Shape

• Color

• Material

Weights do make a difference.  Choose a light sinker for a slow fall of the worm or a heavy sinker to make it stay on the bottom.  Carolina rigs are usually rigged with 1/2 to 1 ounce sinkers, Texas rigs most often use 1/8 to 1/4 ounce leads. Drop shot rigs were originally designed to use small 1/16 to 1/8 ounce leads but some use heavier ones. Picking the right size can make the difference between staying hung up or catching fish.  Light sinkers come through cover with less hang-ups.

Shape of the lead can make a difference in how it comes through cover, too. Long, thin leads work through grass, weeds and wood cover better but short, fat sinkers don't drop into cracks in rocks as badly.  round leads are used for Carolina rigs when fishing mud, clay or sand bottoms without much cover.

Colors of leads may make a difference but probably are more important to the fisherman than to the fish.  Some folks match the color of the lead to the worm, others use sinkers painted black.  Most use sinkers with no color added, either the lead or brass in its natural finish.

A few years ago there was a fad of using brass sinkers with glass beads to make more noise and a different kind of noise. Lead sinkers are banned in some waters and this will become more common. Sinkers made of anything but lead are bigger and more expensive, but may soon be required by law.

Carry a variety of worms leads with you to meet all possible conditions.

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